International

Christ Church's international outreach efforts support the global community through educational and spiritual programming, financial support to mission partners, particularly in Africa and the Middle East, and through the organization of pilgrimages to visit mission partners on their native soil. Parishioners are encouraged to bring worthy international projects to the attention of the Mission Committee. Current partners are listed below in alphabetical order.

 

Afghan Stray Animal League
Contact: Sheila Ward
Website: www.afghanstrayanimals.org

Afghan Stray Animal League (“ASAL”) operates a small shelter/clinic/rescue program for stray animals and working donkeys in Afghanistan. It has been in full time operation since 2004 and helped thousands of dogs, cats and other homeless, sick, and injured animals. ASAL has found homes abroad for hundreds of animals and treats injured working donkeys. Conditions of deep poverty and protracted conflict add to the hardships faced by Afghan animals and the difficulty of helping them. Most Afghans struggle to survive and have few resources and little compassion to spare for animals. Guard dogs are given food and shelter but are usually kept on short chains and receive no medical attention. Stray dogs are ignored at best and often tormented. Donkeys are worked until they become too ill or feeble to haul heavy loads, then are let loose to fend for themselves. Trying to help such animals and build public awareness is very limited by poor security conditions and cultural barriers.

ASAL is also sponsored by the St. Francis Guild. It has almost no overhead, so all gifts go directly to support the operating costs for the shelter and clinic, including medications, food for about 50 dogs and 50 cats, salaries for local staff of 10 including two vets, and rent for clinic and second annex shelter. In the winter, costs increase because of extreme cold and costs of firewood and generator fuel. Volunteer opportunities include collecting donations of towels and blankets and collars, as well as shelter and vet supplies, and by attending ASAL’s fundraisers and helping to find loving homes in the USA for rescued animals.

 

Africa Education Learning Initiative
Website: africaeli.org
Contact: Kitty Hempstone 

The Africa Education and Leadership Initiative (“AfricaELI”) provides access to education for young women ages 16-26 from the Republic of the South Sudan so that they can become leaders in their families and communities. AfricaELI funds scholarships to self-motivated young women so that they can earn a high school degree and go on to engage in business, improve health practices and work towards improving South Sudanese society for the benefit of all of its citizens. AfricaELI coordinates with accredited partner schools in Uganda and South Sudan to provide both formal education and skills training to young women so that they can compete in the labor market and gain the confidence and courage to help break through cultural barriers and uplift their families and communities and join the next generation of leaders. In previous years, Christ Church Georgetown has funded construction projects as well as school fees, but currently, support will go entirely to school fees. The School would welcome visitors and volunteers during the three-week school break in Kampala, when they might come as teachers or speakers.

 

Forgotten Voices International
Contact: Dr. Beverly Nyberg
Website: www.forgottenvoices.org

Forgotten Voices International (“FVI”) works with 59 churches in Southern Africa (currently 22 in Zimbabwe, 25 in Zambia and 12 in Malawi) to empower families and caregivers to meet the needs of orphaned and vulnerable children in their communities. Seeking to demonstrate the love of Jesus Christ, FVI partners with the churches and families to provide for the children’s spiritual, emotional and physical needs. FVI intends that every child experience the love of God and the security of a family, church, and community. Working with committed and qualified churches for three (3) to five (5) years to establish local, sustainable orphan care ministries, FVI and church orphan care committees develop custom plans to empower at risk families and caregivers with parenting, psychosocial and educational support, creating savings groups and providing financial education for economic sustainability. Church partners receive financial support for three (3) years with provisional matching grants the last two (2) years. Periodic assessments ensure that caregiver support results in improved child wellbeing. Currently, FVI and the 59 local churches serve 5117 vulnerable children and caregivers in their communities.

Funds from Christ Church Georgetown will contribute to training field staff and church and community members in using evidence-based tools to perform initial needs assessments and to evaluate the effectiveness of programs. FVI plans to include the development of additional trainers so that a sustainable model of training is established.

 

Friends of Honduras USA
Contact: Martha Van Dale
Website: www.friendsofhondurasusa.org

Friends of Honduras (“FH”) seeks to improve the wellbeing of children and adults in remote areas of Honduras through the building of schools (currently eight (8)), medical facilities, and water filtration systems. Currently, FH are working in concert with the local community and medical doctor in Concepcion del Sur, Santa Barbara, Honduras to rehabilitate an abandoned sewing factory into a facility that will provide housing for the elderly and medical services for all ages with specific emphasis on services for handicapped children and expectant mothers.

Funds from Christ Church Georgetown have provided funds for construction of a medical clinic, kindergartens and schools. This year, FH will apply funds toward the completion of the roof for the facility that will house the elderly and provide medical services. Volunteer opportunities include assisting with building construction, providing medical services, or distributing food and supplies to families in remote villages. Donations of hygiene products and schools supplies are also an ongoing need.

 

Jerusalem Princess Basma Centre
Contact: Louise Ross
Website: www.basma-centre.org

The Jerusalem Princess Basma Centre (“JPBC”) in East Jerusalem, Israel provides comprehensive rehabilitation services for children with disabilities in the West Bank and Gaza through contracts with the Palestinian Ministry of Health. Programs include intensive therapy for children with cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, neuromuscular diseases, autism, and ADHD. The Mother Empowerment Programme has mothers stay on-site with the children for therapy programs lasting three (3) weeks. The Programme includes training mothers so that they can continue therapy once they are home.

Christ Church Georgetown has supported the program previously, enabling twenty (20) children and mothers to participate. With the cessation of US funds to Palestine, private support is especially critical. Volunteer opportunities for skilled workers in child rehabilitation who can travel to the region would be welcome.

 

Mpambara-Cox Foundation
Contact: Anita Cox
Website: www.mcoxfoundation.org

Started in 2008, The Mpambara Foundation (“MCF”) operates multi-faceted programs in Kabale, Western Uganda with the core purpose of alleviating poverty through education. MCF works to improve literacy by partnering with government-aided impoverished schools in rural areas. The aim is to reverse the school-drop-out rate of 70% by grade five, especially for girls. The signature "10:30 Porridge Program" currently provides a school meal for 800 children in two schools daily. Other programs include hosting two Peace Corps Primary Literacy Teacher Specialists, providing microfinance for mothers committed to keeping their children in school, installing clean water in school compounds, promoting health and hygiene, school gardens, and assisting with books and scholastic materials as well as school uniforms for those that cannot afford them. In the U.S., MCF runs cross-cultural programs such as the pen-pal program between Uganda and US children. Currently 150 middle-school children are exchanging three (3) letters a year with children in Uganda.

Funds from Christ Church Georgetown contribute to the budget for housing costs for the two (2) Peace Corps Volunteers who provide English instruction, a critical educational component from grade 5 (when English is introduced) to grade 7 (the year the students sit for the national primary leaving exam).  Funds from Christ Church Georgetown also supplement operating costs, including book storage, utilities for the MCF public library, computers and printers, and part of an accountant’s salary to cover the growing MCF women’s microfinance program. Volunteer opportunities include participating in the pen pal program and might include a mission trip in 2020.

 

Sisters of Saint Mary Foundation for Foreign and Domestic Mission
Contact: Cynthia Efird 
Website: www.stmaryseast.org

The Sisters of St. Mary Foundation for Foreign and Domestic Mission (“SSMF”) is based at an Anglican convent in Luwinga, Malawi, where the sisters have built a Christian community to provide services including feeding and educational opportunities for children orphaned by AIDS living with local families. The convent grounds, established fifteen (15) years ago, now include a nine- acre self-sustaining farm, a tailoring enterprise that provides vestments and women's group uniforms, and a nursery school. The Sisters provide an example of sustainable agriculture and other assistance to the neighboring area. They feed over 150 AIDS orphans in partnership with the local parishes of the area, offering a safe place to play and learn vocational skills, as well as to worship God. The sisters support orphan students during and after secondary school by raising funds for their university and trade school tuition. This is especially helpful for female students, who are expected to do housework as well as to study.

Funds from Christ Church Georgetown will help to provide tuition and room and board for students in university and trade programs. Last year two orphans received undergraduate degrees, one in nursing and the other in agronomy. A total of three have received university degrees since 2015. Currently there are two in college, three in vocational trade schools, four in secondary boarding schools, and seven in secondary day schools. Volunteer opportunities might include a mission trip.